Lucky Clover Superstition imagesSuperstitions . . . Unlucky 13 . . . Black Cats . . . Ladders . . . Broken Mirrors . . . Crows . . . Itchy Palms . . . Superstitions Lucky Clover Superstition images

 
Superstitions :
 

» HOME

APRIL FOOL

BANANA TREE BESIDE A HOUSE

BASEBALL

BATS

BAY LEAVES

BIRTH SIGNS (ASTROLOGY)

BIRTHDAY CANDLES

BLACK CATS

BLOOD TYPE (JAPAN)

BREAK A LEG (THEATRE)

BREAKING A MIRROR

BROOMS

CATCH WARTS FROM A TOAD

CHAMELEONS AND LIZARDS (AFRICA)

CHIMNEY SWEEPS

CHOPSTICKS AND RICE (CHINA)

COUNTING CROWS / SALUTING A MAGPIE

COVERING A YAWN

CROSSING ON THE STAIRS

CROSSING YOUR FINGERS

CURSE OF PELE'S ROCKS

CURSE OF THE MUMMY

DEAD MAN'S HAND

DOGS

DOWSING

DROWNING

ECLIPSE OF THE SUN

FALLING LEAVES

FINGERNAILS

FISH ON FRIDAYS

FLIPPING A COIN

FOUR-LEAF CLOVER

FRIDAY THE 13TH

FULL MOON

GARLIC

GHOST LIGHT (THEATRE)

GIBRALTAR APES

HORSESHOES

I-CHING (CHINA)

KISSING UNDER MISTLETOE

KNOCKING ON WOOD

LADYBIRDS

List of Superstitions

 
Great Websites :
 

Aesop’s Fables

Christmas Jokes

College Humor

Complete Nonsense

Fairy Tales

Famous Poems

Famous Quotes

Free Diet Plans

Free Song Lyrics

Friendship Quotes

Funny Jokes

Funny Pictures

Funny Poems

Funny Quotes

Ghosts

Glaswegian

Humorous Scripts

Inspirational Poems

Knock Knock Jokes

Limerick Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Rabbie Burns

Photographs

Poems for Children

Worst Poems

Poet

Posters

Quotations Online

Riddles

Riddles Online

Tongue Twisters

Witty Quotes

Success Quotes and Poems
Inspirational Quotes and Poems
Biblical Quotes and Poems
Happiness Quotes and Poems
Short Quotes and Poems
Women Quotes and Poems
Philosophical Quotes and Poems
Love Quotes and Poems
Birthday Quotes and Poems
Life Quotes and Poems
Funny Quotes and Poems
Marriage Quotes and Poems
Romantic Quotes and Poems
Motivational Quotes and Poems
Best Quotes and Poems

 

 
 
 
 
 
SUPERSTITIONS.BIZ
 

Superstitions from around the world . . . what brings good luck . . . what brings bad luck?

SUPERSTITION:  PARDONING THE HAGGIS


Description: Men requesting haggis for their 'last meal' will be pardoned.

Origin: Scottish Jacobite Custom

Prince Charles Edward Louis Philip Casimir Stuart (31 December 1720 - 31 January 1788) commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie or The Young Pretender was a Jacobite claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. After a cruel defeat at the hands of the Duke of Cumberland at the Battle of Culloden on 16 April 1746, Charlie fled for his life. With the help of Flora MacDonald he made his way across Scotland, sailed in a tiny boat to the Isle of Skye and then on to France.

In the aftermath of this battle many men were imprisoned and put to death for treason. However, the clan chiefs made it clear to the prison guards that any man requesting Haggis and Whisky as a last meal must be helped to escape. By doing so they hoped to avoid executing Charlie - whose whereabouts was unknown - for it was known that a royal Scot would only accept a final meal of haggis. Even when it was clear that Charlie had safely escaped the custom continued and in 1791 it passed into Scottish Law.

The law was kept secret, otherwise all condemned prisoners would request haggis as their final meal. The last man to receive a pardon in this way was Jock McStrapp of Aberdeen. In 1922 he was found guilty of killing his wife and mother-in-law by dropping sheep on their heads. However, the night before he was due to be hung, he requested 'a big plate of haggis mon, way loads of tumshies. And gies a huge gless o' whisky too.' The following day Jock received a royal pardon and was released. He went on to kill eight other people before accidentally electrocuting himself with an electric toothbrush.


The Skye Boat Song
Chorus:
Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing,
Onward! the sailors cry;
Carry the lad that's born to be King
Over the sea to Skye.
Loud the winds howl, loud the waves roar,
Thunderclaps rend the air;
Baffled, our foes stand by the shore,
Follow they will not dare.
Chorus
Though the waves leap, soft shall ye sleep,
Ocean's a royal bed.
Rocked in the deep, Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head.
Chorus
Many's the lad fought on that day,
Well the Claymore could wield,
When the night came, silently lay
Dead in Culloden's field.
Chorus
Burned are their homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men;
Yet ere the sword cool in the sheath
Charlie will come again.

 

A Scottish haggis climbing on Ben Nevis
 

 

A Scottish haggis in captivity

A Scottish haggis in captivity




<-- Previous     |     Next -->

 

Note: These superstitions were researched and written by Stuart Macfarlane (Website: Stuart Macfarlane )

and Tom Metcalfe (Website: Constructive Resonance

 

The text is covered by copyright law - please do not use without first requesting permission.

 
 
If you found "PARDONING THE HAGGIS" interesting then check out our :

List of Superstitions

 

SUPERSTITIONS.BIZ
 
 
 
Interesting :
 

 
 
   
   

 
 
© Website Design Copyright 2011 by SUPERSTITIONS.BIZ